Gaming Services Workers

What Gaming Services Workers Do

Gaming services workers serve customers in gambling establishments, such as casinos or racetracks.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK-CdIrJuOw

Work Environment

Most gaming services workers are employed in the casino hotels, local government or gambling industries. Because most establishments are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, employees often must work during nights, weekends, and holidays.

How to Become a Gaming Services Worker

Most gaming jobs require a high school diploma or equivalent. Some casinos may require gaming managers to have a college degree. In addition, all gaming services workers must have excellent customer-service skills.

Pay

The median annual wage for gaming services workers was $23,520 in May 2019.

Job Outlook

Employment of gaming services workers is projected to grow 10 percent from 2019 to 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations. Since some states benefit from casinos in the form of tax revenues, additional states currently without commercial gaming establishments may allow new casinos to be built over the next decade.

Gaming services workers serve customers in gambling establishments, such as casinos or racetracks. Some workers tend slot machines or deal cards. Others take bets or pay out winnings. Still others supervise or manage gaming workers and operations.

Duties

Gaming services workers typically do the following:

  • Interact with customers and ensure that they have a pleasant experience
  • Monitor customers for violations of gaming regulations or casino policies
  • Inform their supervisor or a security employee of any irregularities they observe
  • Enforce safety rules and report hazards
  • Explain how to play the games to customers

The following are examples of types of gaming services workers:

Gaming managers and supervisors direct and oversee the gaming operations and personnel in their assigned area. Supervisors circulate among the tables to make sure that everything is running smoothly and that all areas are properly staffed. Gaming managers and supervisors typically do the following:

  • Keep an eye on customers and employees to ensure compliance with all gaming and casino rules
  • Communicate with other departments if security or customer-service issues arise
  • Address customers’ complaints about service
  • Explain house operating rules, such as betting limits, if customers do not understand them
  • Ensure payouts are correct
  • Schedule when and where employees in their section will work
  • Interview, hire, and train new employees

Slot supervisors oversee the activities of the slot department. The job duties of this occupation have changed significantly, as slot machines have become more automated in recent years. Because most casinos use slot machines that give out tickets instead of cash and thus require very little oversight, workers in this occupation spend most of their time providing customer service to slot players. Slot supervisors typically do the following:

  • Watch over the slot section and ensure that players are satisfied with the games
  • Refill machines with tickets when they run out
  • Oversee payment of large jackpots
  • Respond to and resolve customer complaints
  • Interview, hire, and train new employees

Gaming dealers operate table games such as craps, blackjack, and roulette. They stand or sit behind tables while serving customers. Dealers control the pace and action of the game. They announce each player’s move to the rest of the table and let players know when it is their turn. Most dealers are often required to work at least two games, usually blackjack or craps. Gaming dealers typically do the following:

  • Give out cards and provide dice or other equipment to customers
  • Determine winners, calculate and pay off winning bets, and collect on losing bets
  • Continually inspect cards or dice
  • Inform players of the rules of the game
  • Keep track of the amount of money that customers have already bet
  • Exchange paper money for gaming chips

Gaming and sports book writers and runners handle bets on sporting events and take and record bets for customers. Sports book writers and runners also verify tickets and pay out winning tickets. In addition, they help run games such as bingo and keno. Some gaming runners collect winning tickets from customers in a casino. Gaming and sports book writers and runners typically do the following:

  • Scan tickets and calculate winnings
  • Operate the equipment that randomly selects bingo or keno numbers
  • Announce bingo or keno numbers when they are selected
  • Oversee the cash that comes in (on bets) and goes out (on winnings) during their shift

Gaming services workers held about 187,300 jobs in 2019. Employment in the detailed occupations that make up gaming services workers was distributed as follows:

Gambling dealers 102,900
First-line supervisors of gambling services workers 58,000
Gambling service workers, all other 10,900
Gambling and sports book writers and runners 10,400
Gambling managers 5,100

The largest employers of gaming services workers were as follows:

Local government, excluding education and hospitals 25%
Self-employed workers 17
Spectator sports 4

Some gaming services occupations are physically demanding. Gaming dealers spend most of their shift standing behind a table. Although managers and supervisors may spend some limited time working in an office, they must frequently walk up and down the casino floor.

A casino atmosphere also may expose gaming services workers to hazards such as secondhand smoke from cigarettes, cigars, or pipes. Noise from slot machines, gaming tables, and loud customers may be distracting to some, although workers may wear protective headgear in areas where machinery is used to count money.

Work Schedules

Most casinos are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Employees are often scheduled to work nights, weekends, and holidays, which are typically the busiest times for casinos.

This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of gaming services workers.

Occupation Job Duties Entry-Level Education Median Annual Pay, May 2019

Customer Service Representatives

Customer service representatives interact with customers to handle complaints, process orders, and answer questions.

High school diploma or equivalent $34,710

Lodging Managers

Lodging managers ensure that traveling guests have a pleasant experience at their establishment with accommodations. They also ensure that the business is run efficiently and profitably.

High school diploma or equivalent $54,430

Public Relations and Fundraising Managers

Public relations managers direct the creation of materials that will enhance the public image of their employer or client. Fundraising managers coordinate campaigns that bring in donations for their organization.

Bachelor’s degree $116,180

Public Relations Specialists

Public relations specialists create and maintain a favorable public image for the organization they represent.

Bachelor’s degree $61,150

Retail Sales Workers

Retail sales workers help customers find products they want and process customers’ payments.

No formal educational credential $25,440

Sales Managers

Sales managers direct organizations’ sales teams.

Bachelor’s degree $126,640

Security Guards and Gambling Surveillance Officers

Security guards and gambling surveillance officers protect property from illegal activity.

High school diploma or equivalent $29,710

Financial Clerks

Financial clerks do administrative work, keep records, help customers, and carry out financial transactions.

High school diploma or equivalent $40,540

For more information about gaming services workers, visit

American Gaming Association

Casino Careers

O*NET

Gaming Dealers

Gaming Managers

Gaming Service Workers, All Other

Gaming Supervisors

Gaming and Sports Book Writers and Runners

Slot Supervisors


Suggested citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Gaming Services Workers,
at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/personal-care-and-service/gaming-services-occupations.htm (visited ).