Lodging Managers

What Lodging Managers Do

Lodging managers ensure that traveling guests have a pleasant experience at their establishment with accommodations. They also ensure that the business is run efficiently and profitably.

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Work Environment

Because hotels are open 24 hours a day, evening and weekend work is common. Most lodging managers work full time and are often on call. The work can be pressure filled and stressful.

How to Become a Lodging Manager

Lodging managers usually take one of three education paths: a bachelor’s degree in hospitality or hotel management, an associate’s degree or a certificate in hotel management, or a high school diploma combined with several years of experience working in a hotel.

Pay

The median annual wage for lodging managers was $54,430 in May 2019.

Job Outlook

Employment of lodging managers is projected to decline 12 percent from 2019 to 2029.

Lodging managers ensure that guests on vacation or business travel have a pleasant experience at a hotel, motel, or other types of establishments with accommodations. Lodging managers also ensure that the establishment is run efficiently and profitably.

Duties

Lodging managers typically do the following:

  • Inspect guest rooms, public areas, and grounds for cleanliness and appearance
  • Ensure that company standards for guest services, décor, and housekeeping are met
  • Answer questions from guests about hotel policies and services
  • Keep track of how much money the hotel or lodging facility is making
  • Interview, hire, train, and sometimes fire staff members
  • Monitor staff performance to ensure that guests are happy and that the hotel is well run
  • Coordinate front-office activities of hotels or motels and resolve problems
  • Set room rates and budgets, approve expenditures, and allocate funds to various departments

A comfortable room, good food, and a helpful staff can make being away from home an enjoyable experience for guests on vacation or business travel. Lodging managers occasionally greet and register guests. They also try to make sure that guests have a good experience.

Lodging establishments vary in size, from independently owned bed and breakfasts to motels with just a few rooms or to hotels that can have thousands of guest rooms. Larger hotels with more amenities lead to a greater range of duties for lodging managers, such as granting access to a swimming pool, operating a casino, or hosting conventions.

Many lodging managers use online social media for marketing purposes.

The following are examples of types of lodging managers:

General managers oversee all lodging operations at a property. At large hotels with several departments and multiple layers of management, the general manager and several assistant managers coordinate the activities of separate departments. These departments may include housekeeping, human resources, room operations, marketing and sales, purchasing, security, maintenance, recreational facilities, and other activities. For more information, see the profiles on human resources managers; public relations and fundraising managers; financial managers; advertising, promotions, and marketing managers; and food service managers.

Revenue managers work in financial management, monitoring room sales and reservations, overseeing accounting and cash-flow matters at the hotel, projecting occupancy levels, and deciding which rooms to discount and when to offer special rates.

Front-office managers coordinate reservations and room assignments and train and direct the hotel’s front-desk staff. They ensure that guests are treated courteously, that complaints and problems are resolved, and that requests for special services are carried out. Most front-office managers are also responsible for adjusting bills.

Convention service managers coordinate the activities of various departments, to accommodate meetings, conventions, and special events. They meet with representatives of groups to plan the number of conference rooms to be reserved, design the configuration of the meeting space, and determine what other services the groups will need, such as catering or audiovisual requirements. During a meeting or event, they resolve unexpected problems and ensure that hotel operations meet a group’s expectations.

Lodging managers held about 57,200 jobs in 2019. The largest employers of lodging managers were as follows:

Traveler accommodation 59%
Self-employed workers 31
RV (recreational vehicle) parks and recreational camps 2

The pressures of coordinating a wide range of activities, turning a profit for investors, and dealing with dissatisfied guests can be stressful.

Work Schedules

Most lodging managers work full time. Because hotels are open around the clock, working evenings, weekends, and holidays is common. Some managers must be on call 24 hours a day, particularly if they reside at the lodging establishment.

This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of lodging managers.

Occupation Job Duties Entry-Level Education Median Annual Pay, May 2019

Food Service Managers

Food service managers are responsible for the daily operation of restaurants or other establishments that prepare and serve food and beverages.

High school diploma or equivalent $55,320

Gaming Services Workers

Gaming services workers serve customers in gambling establishments, such as casinos or racetracks.

High school diploma or equivalent $23,520

Human Resources Managers

Human resources managers plan, coordinate, and direct the administrative functions of an organization.

Bachelor’s degree $116,720

Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers

Property, real estate, and community association managers take care of the many aspects of residential, commercial, or industrial properties.

High school diploma or equivalent $58,760

Sales Managers

Sales managers direct organizations’ sales teams.

Bachelor’s degree $126,640

For information about career, professional development, and training programs, visit 

American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute

For information about schools and educational programs in hotel and restaurant management, including correspondence courses, visit

Accreditation Commission for Programs in Hospitality Administration

International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Education

For information about lodging news operations, visit

Hotel News Now

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Lodging Managers


Suggested citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Lodging Managers,
at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/lodging-managers.htm (visited ).